Posts tagged science

Science art: Driven. Evolving patterns over film on silicon waferAnton Darhuber, Benjamin Fischer and Sandra TroianMicrofluidic Research and Engineering Laboratory, Department of Chemical Engineering

This image illustrates evolving dynamical patterns formed during the spreading of a surface-active substance (surfactant) over a thin liquid film on a silicon wafer. After spin-coating of glycerol, small droplets of oleic acid were deposited. The usually slow spreading process was highly accelerated by the surface tension imbalance that triggered a cascade of hydrodynamic instabilities. Such surface-tension driven flow phenomena are believed to be important for the self-cleaning mechanism of the lung as well as pulmonary drug delivery.
source: Art of Science Competition
Science art: Driven. Evolving patterns over film on silicon wafer
Anton Darhuber, Benjamin Fischer and Sandra Troian
Microfluidic Research and Engineering Laboratory, Department of Chemical Engineering
This image illustrates evolving dynamical patterns formed during the spreading of a surface-active substance (surfactant) over a thin liquid film on a silicon wafer. After spin-coating of glycerol, small droplets of oleic acid were deposited. The usually slow spreading process was highly accelerated by the surface tension imbalance that triggered a cascade of hydrodynamic instabilities. Such surface-tension driven flow phenomena are believed to be important for the self-cleaning mechanism of the lung as well as pulmonary drug delivery.
Science: Fertilization, SEM
Coloured scanning electron micrograph (SEM) of a sperm (blue) attempting to penetrate a human egg (orange). The sperm has a rounded head and a long tail with which it swims. Women usually release one egg (ovum) per month, whereas men release millions of sperm in each ejaculation. Only one of these sperm can penetrate the egg’s thick outer layer (zona pellucida) and fertilise it. Fertilisation occurs when the sperm’s genetic material (deoxyribonucleic acid, DNA) fuses with the egg’s DNA. When this occurs the egg forms a barrier to other sperm. Magnification: x700

Science: Fertilization, SEM

Coloured scanning electron micrograph (SEM) of a sperm (blue) attempting to penetrate a human egg (orange). The sperm has a rounded head and a long tail with which it swims. Women usually release one egg (ovum) per month, whereas men release millions of sperm in each ejaculation. Only one of these sperm can penetrate the egg’s thick outer layer (zona pellucida) and fertilise it. Fertilisation occurs when the sperm’s genetic material (deoxyribonucleic acid, DNA) fuses with the egg’s DNA. When this occurs the egg forms a barrier to other sperm. Magnification: x700

the-mighty-ribozyme:

I also really liked this one!
Biology cookies: petri dish

the-mighty-ribozyme:

I also really liked this one!

Biology cookies: petri dish

Science Art: Colorful Cell Division
Source: artologica 

Science Art: Colorful Cell Division

Source: artologica 

"Bumblebee" gecko discovered in Papua New Guinea

"Bumblebee" gecko discovered in Papua New Guinea

A new species of gecko with black and gold bands like a bumblebee and slender toes termed a “striking surprise” has been discovered deep in the tropical forests of Papua New Guinea, the U.S. Geological survey said

Solar prominence

Solar prominence

The prominence (top right), is a dense cloud of plasma, or ionised gas, erupting from the chromosphere (orange) - from the sun’s surface. Prominences are typically at temperatures of 60,000 Kelvin, much cooler than the several million Kelvin of the surrounding corona (red). 

Lung Cancer Cell Division


Lung cancer cell division

Coloured scanning electron micrograph (SEM) of a lung cancer cell during cell division (cytokinesis). The two daughter cells remain temporarily joined by a cytoplasmic bridge (centre). Cancer cells divide rapidly in a chaotic, uncontrolled manner. They may clump to form tumours, which invade and destroy surrounding tissues. 

Scientists counting emperor penguins from space have found twice as many of the birds in Antarctica as expected

Evolution of Eating Habits

Omnivores eat both meat and vegetarian. Apparently, omnivore animals like apes, foxes, bears and more came from ancestors that primarily ate plants, or animals, but not both. The Red fox, foe example, feeds on a wide range of foods, from rodents and birds to insects, eggs and fruit, and in urban areas they often scavenge from dustbins. According to the new study, its feeding habits have changes over time

Source: Science Daily


Virus-Cell Interaction Joerg SchroeerDepartment of Molecular Biology, Princeton

Human cytomegalovirus infected human endothelial cells. Multicolor Immunofluorescence (IF). Blue: DAPI = cellular DNA. Green = GFP (green fluorescence protein). Red + Magenta = two different viral proteins. Captured with a Zeiss LSM510 laser scanning confocal microscope.

See here for more photos from Princeton University’s 2005 Art of Science Competition.

Source: stressface
Virus-Cell Interaction
Joerg Schroeer
Department of Molecular Biology, Princeton

Human cytomegalovirus infected human endothelial cells. Multicolor Immunofluorescence (IF). Blue: DAPI = cellular DNA. Green = GFP (green fluorescence protein). Red + Magenta = two different viral proteins. Captured with a Zeiss LSM510 laser scanning confocal microscope.
See here for more photos from Princeton University’s 2005 Art of Science Competition.

Source: stressface

Medical photography: Blood clot
  Source: thecoloradopursuit

Medical photography: Blood clot

  Source: thecoloradopursuit

Explanation for the dropping populations of bees?

Scientists have discovered ways in which even low doses of widely used pesticides can harm bumblebees and honeybees, interfering with their homing abilities and making them lose their way.

Source: Reuters

world-shaker:

Top 10 Reasons for Taking Chemistry

world-shaker:

Top 10 Reasons for Taking Chemistry

View of the Stars from space station orbiting earth  - by NASA astronaut Don Pettit.


Water purifying tea bags that cost half a cent and 6 other amazing inventions made possible by nanotechnology
Source: Life Scoop, mylifescoop.com
Nan­ote­chol­o­gy has evolved by leaps and bounds over the past few years, and we’ve seen scores of big devel­op­ments made pos­si­ble by designs small­er than the eye can see. To get you up to speed on the lat­est and great­est in nano-scale…

Water purifying tea bags that cost half a cent and 6 other amazing inventions made possible by nanotechnology

Source: Life Scoop, mylifescoop.com

Nan­ote­chol­o­gy has evolved by leaps and bounds over the past few years, and we’ve seen scores of big devel­op­ments made pos­si­ble by designs small­er than the eye can see. To get you up to speed on the lat­est and great­est in nano-scale…